ATLAS OBSCURA

The Lake Michigan Triangle 
Stretching from Ludington to Benton Harbor, Michigan and to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, the Lake Michigan Triangle has inspired numerous accounts of activity that are difficult to explain by rational thought. The mystery began in 1891, when a schooner named the Thomas Hume, set off across the Lake to pick up lumber. Almost overnight in a torrent of wind, the Thomas Hume disappeared, along with its crew of seven sailors. The wooden boat was never found, and extensive search failed to recover even a piece of driftwood.
After the turn of the century, strange events happened at steady intervals. Of the more mysterious is the case of the Rosa Belle. In 1921, 11 people inside the ship, who were all members of the Benton Harbor House of David, disappeared when their ship was found overturned and floating in Lake Michigan. While it appeared that the ship had been damaged in a collision, no other ship had reported an accident, and no other remains had been found. Many found the incident particularly eerie, because the Rosa Belle had been rebuilt after an earlier wreck in the 19th century, very similar to the deadly one in 1921.
Of course, its legend continues to grow… High-res

The Lake Michigan Triangle 

Stretching from Ludington to Benton Harbor, Michigan and to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, the Lake Michigan Triangle has inspired numerous accounts of activity that are difficult to explain by rational thought. The mystery began in 1891, when a schooner named the Thomas Hume, set off across the Lake to pick up lumber. Almost overnight in a torrent of wind, the Thomas Hume disappeared, along with its crew of seven sailors. The wooden boat was never found, and extensive search failed to recover even a piece of driftwood.

After the turn of the century, strange events happened at steady intervals. Of the more mysterious is the case of the Rosa Belle. In 1921, 11 people inside the ship, who were all members of the Benton Harbor House of David, disappeared when their ship was found overturned and floating in Lake Michigan. While it appeared that the ship had been damaged in a collision, no other ship had reported an accident, and no other remains had been found. Many found the incident particularly eerie, because the Rosa Belle had been rebuilt after an earlier wreck in the 19th century, very similar to the deadly one in 1921.

Of course, its legend continues to grow…