ATLAS OBSCURA

KELBURN CASTLE

-LARGS, SCOTLAND

Kelburn Castle in Scotland is a stately home whose original structure likely dates from before the 13th century. It is thought to be one of the oldest castles in Scotland to have been continuously occupied by the same family — the other being Dunvegan Castle — and its original Norman Keep (which was built primarily for defense rather than comfort) is now enclosed within a larger home that was completed around 1581.

Learn the story behind the mural at Atlas Obscura

treyratcliffphotos:

The Crazy Colors of Death Valley
I had no idea Death Valley would be so full of colors! Of course, the HDR process takes the existing colors and really helps them to stand out… and, as everyone knows, that’s perfectly cool with me!I was close to this area back in college when I used to have a double-major in geophysics and computer-science. I ended up dropping the geo bit of it because of a fight with the professor, but I’ve always kept my fascination with rocks. I don’t know enough about everything I see… like, when I see this below, I have a few ideas on what probably made it like this, but I don’t know for sure. Either way, it’s awesome… I’m glad for all the sulfur and iron in the area and its apparent randomness!- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.
High-res

treyratcliffphotos:

The Crazy Colors of Death Valley

I had no idea Death Valley would be so full of colors! Of course, the HDR process takes the existing colors and really helps them to stand out… and, as everyone knows, that’s perfectly cool with me!

I was close to this area back in college when I used to have a double-major in geophysics and computer-science. I ended up dropping the geo bit of it because of a fight with the professor, but I’ve always kept my fascination with rocks. I don’t know enough about everything I see… like, when I see this below, I have a few ideas on what probably made it like this, but I don’t know for sure. Either way, it’s awesome… I’m glad for all the sulfur and iron in the area and its apparent randomness!

- Trey Ratcliff

Click here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

(via travelthisworld)

SERPENT D’OCÉAN
-SAINT-BREVIN-LES-PINS, FRANCE
Given its location on the shore, the Serpent D’Océan can be seen as a strangely living creature rising from the ocean waters or a purposefully preserved skeleton held above the shallow waves depending on the level of the tide upon a given visit. But despite the changing tides, fantasy, art, and horror have rarely been so steadfastly intertwined. 
Learn more about the aluminum skeleton of Chinese mythology emerging from a French shore at Atlas Obscura High-res

SERPENT D’OCÉAN

-SAINT-BREVIN-LES-PINS, FRANCE

Given its location on the shore, the Serpent D’Océan can be seen as a strangely living creature rising from the ocean waters or a purposefully preserved skeleton held above the shallow waves depending on the level of the tide upon a given visit. But despite the changing tides, fantasy, art, and horror have rarely been so steadfastly intertwined. 

Learn more about the aluminum skeleton of Chinese mythology emerging from a French shore at Atlas Obscura

DENSUȘ CHURCH
-DENSUȘ, ROMANIA
The Church of St. Nicholas in Densuș is among the oldest and most unusual sacred buildings in Romania, and almost certainly the country’s oldest still-used Orthodox church.
It likely dates from the 13th Century, although the original structure on that site may have been built much earlier. Since no written documentation of its founding survives, its exact age is disputed. Theories about the structure’s origins abound, including that it was built on the site of a pagan temple, or served as a mausoleum for a Roman general. The Late Romanesque construction is curiously piecemeal, giving the impression that it was built in several stages, also incorporating stone from the nearby ruins of Roman Sarmizegetusa (Ulpia Traiana).
More at Atlas Obscura  High-res

DENSUȘ CHURCH

-DENSUȘ, ROMANIA

The Church of St. Nicholas in Densuș is among the oldest and most unusual sacred buildings in Romania, and almost certainly the country’s oldest still-used Orthodox church.

It likely dates from the 13th Century, although the original structure on that site may have been built much earlier. Since no written documentation of its founding survives, its exact age is disputed. Theories about the structure’s origins abound, including that it was built on the site of a pagan temple, or served as a mausoleum for a Roman general. The Late Romanesque construction is curiously piecemeal, giving the impression that it was built in several stages, also incorporating stone from the nearby ruins of Roman Sarmizegetusa (Ulpia Traiana).

More at Atlas Obscura